We all go through our annual checklist for our health….

  • Yearly physical
  • Dentist appointment
  • Kids exams

So what about your vision exams?  Did you forget to schedule that again? 

It is just as important to take care of your eyes as anything else.  Our eyes work for us all day long, every day.  It should be a priority to make sure they are healthy.  Whether you are enjoying your view from the office or can’t wait to see the world on vacation, we can help you make sure that your view is the best.

Here are several ways to keep your eyes healthy:

March is Save Your Vision Month! 

This year our focus is to help you reduce your risk of prolonged exposure to blue light and the importance of receiving regular, comprehensive eye exams.

Over exposure to blue light from our electronics causes a variety of problems including eye strain, neck and shoulder pain, dry and red eyes, blurred vision, headaches, and sleep disorders. Over 80% of Americans know that looking at their screen is unhealthy, but we continue to do so for over 8 hours a day.  We know that it is almost impossible to get away from our electronics and our lives can be centered around our computer, smartphones, and tablets but that doesn't mean you should suffer.

Consider using the “20-20-20 Rule”.....

February is Macular Degeneration Awareness Month. 

Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common cause of blindness that affects people as they get older.

AMD affects the very back of the eye, the retina.

The retina is located in the very back of the eye.  It consists of cells that detect light.  If the retina were a dartboard, the macula would be the bullseye.  It has the best vision of the retina and is responsible for the vision that we use to read or to recognize faces.

 

Eye Health.We hope you enjoyed your Thanksgiving and the beginning of the holiday season.  With all of the great feasts prepared for this time of year, it’s a good time to discuss ocular nutrition.

We’ve all been told to eat our carrots to help our sight. We’ve seen vitamin preparations advertised as improving macular degeneration.  So, what role does nutrition have in maintenance of healthy eyes?

This week’s topic is retinal detachment.  The retina is located in the back of the eye and works similar to the film of a camera.  It consists of several layers of nerve cells that sense light and relay the image to the brain.  A retinal detachment occurs when one layer separates from the others.

Retinal detachments are most often caused by the vitreous (gel on the inside of the eye) separating from the retina.  During this process the vitreous can create tears in the retina.  Fluid flows into these tears and between the retinal layers causing a detachment. 

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.  Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women (behind skin cancer).  More than a quarter million new cases are diagnosed each year.  This year more than 40,000 women are expected to die of this disease.  My mother was one of them.

Fortunately, the death rate from breast cancer has been declining due to advancements in treatment and early screening.  Self examination and mammography are used to detect cancer early.

 

 

Diabetes is a disease where the blood sugar becomes elevated.  It affects nearly 30 million Americans and nearly a third of  these people don’t know they have the disease. 

Diabetes can affect every part of the eye.  The most serious threat to vision occurs when diabetes causes damage to blood vessels in the retina.  This is called retinopathy.  The damaged blood vessels can leak fluid and blood.  When this happens the retina does not receive the nutrients and oxygen it needs.  The retina responds by releasing a hormone that causes new blood vessels to grow. 

Summer is finally here and it is time to celebrate the birth of our great nation.  That means enjoying fireworks.

Unfortunately, fireworks can be associated with eye injuries.  In 2014 there were 1,300 eye injuries from fireworks that required emergency treatment. That’s double the number from two years earlier.

Fireworks can result in burns, rupture of the eye and retinal detachments.  These can all lead to permanent vision loss. 

I hope everyone is enjoying the great weather we’re having.  Although we love these sunny days, there are some ways in which the sun and other forms of light can be damaging to the eyes.

One form of damage is called solar retinopathy.  It occurs when someone looks directly into the sun.  This can also happen when viewing an eclipse or when taking a picture of the sun through a camera.

Symptoms can occur within hours.  The symptoms include a loss of central vision.  One can also experience blurred vision, distorted vision and aching around the eyebrow.

This week’s topic is ocular injuries.  Over 2 million eye injuries occur each year. Nearly half of these occur in or around the home.

Eye injuries occur in a variety of ways.  They can range from mild to severe and blinding.  Nearly eighty percent of injuries occur when no eye protection is used.